Neighborhood Swap Day!

Twice a year everyone in the neighborhood takes all the stuff they don’t want want or need and sets it out for neighborhood swap day. Like the large metal milk jug that my aunt gifted me because she didn’t want it. Someone else loved it and took it away, while I strolled around and got my pick of the other goodies folks have set out.

burger
I didn’t take this burger piñata, but isn’t it cute?

Well, technically it’s called Residential Bulk Collection, and it’s for bulky items that folks consider trash and just want to get rid of. The scrappers get a lot of the good stuff, too. There’s constantly another scrapper trailer driving around looking for metal pieces they can collect. It’s kind of disappointing that they end up recycling some items that could be reused, but at least it keeps things out of the landfill.

And it’s a great way for much other stuff to find new homes also. Need a new-to-you dresser or table? How about a book to read? This is a perfect time to get something for free and to save stuff from the landfill.

bulk
Many goodies collected this weekend

Here are the various treasures (and less treasured items) I collected:

  • (Ignore all the grey bricks. I did pick those up from the curb, but it was for a nearby multi-family residence that doesn’t have the same bulk service.)
  • Blue shelf – Not pictured since it was set out earlier and grabbed earlier. It’s already in the garage happily organizing pots, trowels, and other garage-dwelling items that were previously scattered on the floor or resting somewhere inconvenient.
  • Hanging pot – There were two of these and I was only interested in extra ingredients for the compost, so I dumped the soil from one into the other to tote it back more easily. Folks must have thought I was crazy carrying around that thing, but they don’t know what they’re missing.
  • 6 light grey ceramic tiles – In retrospect, I’m not sure if this is enough tiles to be useful to me and I may keep passing these along.
  • Citronella candles – To discourage mosquitoes. They’re probably not too effective, but I’m sure I can find someone who wants them if I decide not to keep them.
  • Wide-ruled paper – I know plenty of people with school-age children.
  • Fabric adhesive – I’m second-guessing this now, but no matter. Even if I can’t find a new home for it, I haven’t done any harm by delaying its trip to the landfill.
  • Christmas greeting cards – I’ll use these next year.
  • Card games rule book – Mostly so I can learn another type of solitaire sans computer.
  • 12 brick pavers – I can always use more brick pavers for my garden. This was a perfect find for me.
  • White marble chips – It says erosion control on the bag, worth a try.
  • Pink ceramic pot – Which will be perfect for the previously neglected snake plant that a coworker passed on to me recently.

If I had a truck, I would also have grabbed the three or four Christmas trees I saw while out. They’re going to be turned into mulch so it’s not a bad future for them, but they’d be even better as mulch in my yard or protecting the area by the creek from erosion. Well, that’s okay. I can share.

Of course my favorite find ever from a bulk collection week was Free Serenity, still hanging serenely on my bedroom wall. Has anyone else scored something great from what other folks considered garbage?

 

Book I Read In 2017 – Part 1

Reading is one of my favorite hobbies. It’s free. It helps me better understand other people. And I can totally do it while curled up in bed on a cold day. This year I thought it would be interesting to keep track of what I read just to see how my interests change over time. Even within this past month, however, there seems to be a pretty decent variety.

books

The Book of Genesis by R Crumb – If you’ve already read a couple of translations of Genesis and are interested in another perspective, this illustrated book definitely fits the bill. The illustrations are sometimes distracting from the story but more often add another layer of context and understanding.

War with the Newts by Karel Capek – The plot is similar to Capek’s R.U.R. in that there are creatures who start to become more human-like and then get out of hand. This book touches on war, slavery, humanity, and invasive species. It’s a delightfully quick read, but it makes up for that with time that you spend staring out into space just thinking about things.

One Hundred Demons by Lynda Barry – If you had to draw 100 of your personal demons, what would they be? One of mine would probably be a leaf-footed stink bug because they’re just creepy. Here Barry shares her own demons in these illustrated stories.

Eco-Chic Home by Emily Anderson – There are only a few projects in this book that I’d do. The rest left me either uninspired or in some cases disappointed that perfectly good items were being upcycled into something of lower value.

90 Classic Books for People in a Hurry by Henrik Lange – In one page each, I finally learned the super high level plot of some classics like One Hundred Years of Solitude (I’ll read it someday) and Lolita. Others I had already read, and the summaries varied from hilarious to meh. And yet others, I had never heard of. (How do you define “Classic Books”?) If you pick it up in the library, you can probably read the pages for just your favorites and be done in a few minutes, so there’s nothing to lose.

The Story of My Tits by Jennifer Hayden – This is a sometimes humorous, sometimes serious graphic novel, telling the story of the author’s own life and the ways in which she’s been impacted by breast cancer. So many people I’m acquainted with have been diagnosed, and the whole time I was reading this book I was hoping she would explain what the hell is going on with the world. But I start thinking that way whenever my brain gets on this topic. Would recommend this book both for the engaging storyline and the insight into understanding how different people deal with hard truths.

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared Diamond – This was our book club book of the month. First of all, one word of warning, this is a really long book. That said, it contains insights into why people sometimes do things that destroy the environment, against their own best interests. One of the stories involves Easter Island, once full of trees totally deforested by the time Europeans set eyes on it. For the person who cut down the last tree, what was he thinking?

The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger – Yet another graphic novel, this time about a bookmobile that contains everything the visitor has ever read, including cereal boxes and journals, and about the lengths that one person would go through to be united with these written memories forever.

The Hypo: The Melancholic Young Lincoln by Noah Van Sciver – This book left me in the lurch, as I was afterwards wondering how in the world this guy could have ever become president. I may have to read a full biography someday to learn what happened in that gap before my education kicks in about him actually being president. Wouldn’t recommend just because it ends so early.

Perennial Vegetables by Eric Toensmeier – Some of these would absolutely not grow in central Texas, but I now have a few more plants on my wishlist. I just wish there was also such a thing as a carrot tree.

Garbage Land: On the Secret Trail of Trash by Elizabeth Royte – Most books about garbage get either excessively scientific or depressing, but I love them all anyway. And this book is even better because it’s told by an outsider of the garbage world who is enthralled to explore what becomes of her refuse. She jumps hurdles to be able to visit landfills, MRFs, composting facilities, and more. In her more personal journey, she tracks those things that she disposes, tries to reduce her own garbage, attempts to reduce the related manufacturing garbage by buying less, and finally discusses extended producer responsibility. Loved it. 🙂

That’s it so far! You may see some other gardening books in the photo above, but I’ve only listed out the ones where I read at least half of the book this year–not just a particular chapter for reference or a quick skim before setting it aside uninterested. These all went back to the library today. Time to pick up the next set of good reads!